Category Archives: Social Security

Olivia and Liam Top Social Security’s Charts

Duo Remain America’s Most Popular Baby Names for 2021

Olivia and Liam are America’s most popular baby names in 2021. Liam has been the top choice for new parents for five years in a row, and Olivia has topped the list for three years. Once again, during this unprecedented time, parents chose to stick with familiar names. Out of both Top 10 lists combined, only one name changed, with Theodore replacing Alexander in popularity. The name Theodore joins the Top 10 list for the first time–welcome to the club “Teddy!”

Here are the top 10 boys and girls names for 2021:

Boys Girls
1. Liam 1. Olivia
2. Noah 2. Emma
3. Oliver 3. Charlotte
4. Elijah 4. Amelia
5. James 5. Ava
6. William 6. Sophia
7. Benjamin 7. Isabella
8. Lucas 8. Mia
9. Henry 9. Evelyn
10. Theodore 10. Harper

 

If You Will Be Filing A Tax Return, Do Not Forget To Include Your Benefit Statement With Your Tax Return

Your Benefit Statement is a tax form from Social Security that shows the total amount of Social Security benefits you received in the previous year. It is also referred to as an SSA-1099. You should report the amount of Social Security benefits you received to the Internal Revenue Service on your federal tax return.

The Benefit Statement is not available for people who only receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments because SSI payments are not taxed.

If you receive Social Security benefits, SSA mailed your Benefit Statement to the address on file with them. If you did not receive it, or if it was lost, you can get your SSA-1099 instantly online with your personal my Social Security account at:

www.ssa.gov/myaccount/replacement-SSA-1099.html.

Social Security Announces 5.9 Percent Benefit Increase for 2022

Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits for approximately 70 million Americans will increase 5.9 percent in 2022, the Social Security Administration announced today.

The 5.9 percent cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) will begin with benefits payable to more than 64 million Social Security beneficiaries in January 2022. Increased payments to approximately 8 million SSI beneficiaries will begin on December 30, 2021. (Note: some people receive both Social Security and SSI benefits). The Social Security Act ties the annual COLA to the increase in the Consumer Price Index as determined by the Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics.

STUDENT DEBT RELIEF FOR THE DISABLED

The U.S. Department of Education announced yesterday (August 20, 2021) that it will cancel $5.8 billion in student debt for more than 320,000 borrowers. The debt forgiveness, which will go to borrowers with a total and permanent disability, will be automatically granted using data already available to the Social Security Administration. Borrowers will begin to see the relief in September.

Missing Economic Impact Payment

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) issued the third round of Economic Impact Payments (EIP) in April. Most Social Security beneficiaries and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) recipients should have received their EIPs by now. If a person is missing their first or second EIP, they need to file a 2020 tax return with the IRS and claim the 2020 Recovery Rebate Credit (RRC) as soon as possible.

Any person who did not receive his or her EIP, or the full amount of their EIP, please read this carefully. To get any missing first or second EIPs, file a 2020 tax return with the IRS and claim the 2020 Recovery Rebate Credit (RRC) immediately. People should file the 2020 tax return even if they have no income to report for 2020. When the tax return is processed, the IRS will pay the RRC as a tax refund. The IRS will send any additional third EIP amount owed in 2021 separately. 

If people already filed their 2020 tax return, they do not need to do anything else.

Social Security Announces 1.3 Percent Benefit Increase for 2021

Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits for approximately 70 million Americans will increase 1.3 percent in 2021, the Social Security Administration announced today.

The 1.3 percent cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) will begin with benefits payable to more than 64 million Social Security beneficiaries in January 2021. Increased payments to more than 8 million SSI beneficiaries will begin on December 31, 2020. (Note: some people receive both Social Security and SSI benefits). The Social Security Act ties the annual COLA to the increase in the Consumer Price Index as determined by the Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Your Social Security Benefits Could Be In Grave Danger

If the payroll tax deferral becomes permanent next year, as the President indicates he wants to do, the trust fund that pays out Social Security benefits could run out in three years without other funds to cover the shortfall, according to a new analysis.

The fund that provides disability benefits would deplete even sooner — by the second half of next year, according to the chief actuary of the Social Security Administration.

Currently, the Social Security funds are estimated to run out in 2034, while the disability fund is expected to remain solvent until 2065, according to the 2020 OASDI Trustees Report.

Social Security Unveils Redesigned Retirement Benefits Portal

Social Security Unveils Redesigned Retirement Benefits Portal at socialsecurity.gov

The Social Security Administration announced the first of several steps the agency is taking to improve the public’s experience on its website. The newly redesigned retirement benefits portal, at www.socialsecurity.gov/benefits/retirement, will help millions of people prepare for and apply for retirement.

“We are working hard to continue improving our website to provide people with clear, helpful information and easy access to our online services,” said Andrew Saul, Commissioner of Social Security. “Our new retirement portal is more user-friendly and easier to navigate, whether someone is ready to learn about, apply for, or manage their retirement benefits.”

The redesigned portal will make it easier for people to find and read about Social Security retirement benefits, with fewer pages and condensed, rewritten, and clearer information. The portal also is optimized for mobile devices so people can learn and do what they want from wherever they want, and the portal now includes the ability to subscribe to receive retirement information and updates.

Good News Regarding Social Security Trust Fund

Good News Regarding Social Security Trust Fund

The Social Security Board of Trustees released their 2020 annual report earlier this week, which included some positive news: the financial health of the Federal Disability Insurance (DI) Trust Fund has improved significantly and can now pay full benefits until 2065. This estimate is 13 years more than what was indicated in last year’s report and 33 years longer than the 2018 report. After 2065, the trust fund is predicted to pay 92 percent of benefits.